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reseau
express
metropolitain

West Island and Airport

There are eight REM stations in total in the West Island and Airport sector, covering several boroughs and cities, including the Pierrefonds-Roxboro territory, the borough of Saint-Laurent, the City of Dorval (airport), as well as the cities of Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, Kirkland, and Pointe-Claire.

Click on the section that interests you:

Stations in this sector

Sunnybrooke Station. The Sunnybrooke station will replace the existing train station of the same name. It is an elevated station, east of Sunnybrooke Boulevard and adjacent to a new overpass above the boulevard. The urban integration (entrance square and plantings) is designed to provide a convivial space in front of the station. Image for indicative purposes only.
Sunnybrooke Station. The Sunnybrooke station will replace the existing train station of the same name. It is an elevated station, east of Sunnybrooke Boulevard and adjacent to a new overpass above the boulevard. The urban integration (entrance square and plantings) is designed to provide a convivial space in front of the station. Image for indicative purposes only.
Pierrefonds-Roxboro Station. The Pierrefonds-Roxboro station will replace the current train station. It is an elevated station, with a large public square of 5,000 m² located to the north of the station, at the parking level and under the elevated structure. Image for indicative purposes only.
Pierrefonds-Roxboro Station. The Pierrefonds-Roxboro station will replace the current train station. It is an elevated station, with a large public square of 5,000 m² located to the north of the station, at the parking level and under the elevated structure. Image for indicative purposes only.
Des Sources Station. It is distinguished by a public square to the northeast of the station, which links Des Sources Boulevard to the station entrance. The pedestrian path will be made more pleasant through the presence of trees and vegetation. Image for indicative purposes only.
Des Sources Station. It is distinguished by a public square to the northeast of the station, which links Des Sources Boulevard to the station entrance. The pedestrian path will be made more pleasant through the presence of trees and vegetation. Image for indicative purposes only.
Fairview–Pointe-Claire Station. The Fairview–Pointe-Claire station is located along Highway 40 near the shopping centre with the same name. A bus terminal will facilitate access to the station from residential neighborhoods on the West Island. Image for indicative purposes only.
Fairview–Pointe-Claire Station. The Fairview–Pointe-Claire station is located along Highway 40 near the shopping centre with the same name. A bus terminal will facilitate access to the station from residential neighborhoods on the West Island. Image for indicative purposes only.
Kirkland Station. The Kirkland station underwent unique architectural treatment due to its high visibility along the Trans-Canada Highway. Image for indicative purposes only.
Kirkland Station. The Kirkland station underwent unique architectural treatment due to its high visibility along the Trans-Canada Highway. Image for indicative purposes only.
Anse-à-L’Orme Station. Anse-à-l’Orme station is the REM’s terminal station on the West Island, located in Sainte-Anne­-de-Bellevue. It’s equipped with a park-and-ride lot and a bus terminal to serve neighbouring municipalities. This station will also provide access to the future Grand Parc de l’Ouest, which is located nearby, and its 3,000 hectares of nature. Image for indicative purposes only.
Anse-à-L’Orme Station. Anse-à-l’Orme station is the REM’s terminal station on the West Island, located in Sainte-Anne­-de-Bellevue. It’s equipped with a park-and-ride lot and a bus terminal to serve neighbouring municipalities. This station will also provide access to the future Grand Parc de l’Ouest, which is located nearby, and its 3,000 hectares of nature. Image for indicative purposes only.
Marie-Curie Station. Marie-Curie station is located in the heart of Technoparc Montréal, a science and technology park bringing together more than 100 companies and over 7,000 employees. The design and route of the REM were specifically adapted to protect the wetlands in this area. Image for indicative purposes only.
Marie-Curie Station. Marie-Curie station is located in the heart of Technoparc Montréal, a science and technology park bringing together more than 100 companies and over 7,000 employees. The design and route of the REM were specifically adapted to protect the wetlands in this area. Image for indicative purposes only.
YUL-Montréal-Trudeau-Airport Station. The REM will provide fast and direct service to Montréal-Trudeau Airport. It will take about 25 minutes to get there from downtown. This station is still under development by Aéroports de Montréal (ADM).
YUL-Montréal-Trudeau-Airport Station. The REM will provide fast and direct service to Montréal-Trudeau Airport. It will take about 25 minutes to get there from downtown. This station is still under development by Aéroports de Montréal (ADM).
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Visit of the future Fairview-Pointe-Claire station

Work

Ongoing and upcoming work 

Construction of the Sunnybrooke and Pierrefonds-Roxboro stations began in February and will continue through 2021, while the foundations for the first pillars of the elevated portion of the Pierrefonds-Roxboro route are being drilled this spring. At the same time, the railway tracks will be doubled and completely rebuilt for the REM. 

On the Anse-à-l'Orme Branch side, the REM route first runs through the old Doney Branch and then crosses Highway 40 to run alongside the westbound lanes. Launching gantries Anne and Marie continue to progress, gradually building the elevated structure that is now quite prominent on the landscape.  

Construction of the Fairview-Pointe-Claire and Anse-à-l’Orme stations will continue in 2021. This year will also feature the start of foundation construction for the other two stations on this branch: Des Sources and Kirkland. 

In the Technoparc sector, construction of the elevated structure along Alfred-Nobel Boulevard is under way.  

In addition, drilling of the tunnel that will connect Marie-Curie and YUL-Aéroport-Montréal-Trudeau stations began in October 2020. The 3.5-km-long and over 30-metre-deep tunnel is being drilled using an impressive tunnel boring machine nicknamed Alice, which is equipped to dig through rock and assemble the tunnel almost simultaneously.  

Commissioning schedule in this sector  

  • West Island segment: Spring 2024  
  • Airport segment: End of 2024 

Works info

All obstructions
Construction activities
Spring – summer 2021

Fairview–Pointe-Claire Station construction

Details
Construction activities
Spring – summer 2021

Anse-à-l’Orme Station construction

Details

Public meetings

Visit our Events page to access summaries of the past meetings.

FAQ

West Island

The REM will run in part on existing rail corridors. To ensure safety on this high frequency network, there will be no grade crossings. In Pierrefonds-Roxboro, the grade crossings on Alexander Street and Sunnybrooke Boulevard will be transformed into railway overpasses. The grade crossings at 11th Avenue, Gouin Boulevard West and Des Sources Boulevard will be eliminated with the construction of a 1.6-kilometre elevated structure.  

Map of elevated railways – Sunnybrooke sector 

 

Map of elevated railways – Pierrefonds-Roxboro sector 

 

More info

The Des Sources and Saint-Anne-de-Bellevue stations will feature parking lots to facilitate access for drivers. Discussions are under way with various partners to determine the number of spaces that will be available at the Fairview-Pointe-Claire and Kirkland stations. At the Pierrefonds-Roxboro and Sunnybrooke stations, REM users can park in the existing parking spaces for the Deux-Montagnes line. 

We also intend to focus on a sustainable solution of active and public transit. Bus networks in various South Shore municipalities will be revised to optimize feeder service to REM’s stations. The buses will stop near the station to ensure quick and efficient transfers to REM's metro cars. This collaboration with transit companies will continue throughout the project to ensure optimal feeder service as soon as the REM is put into service.

The route from the West Island to downtown and the South Shore is a direct line, with no transfers.  

For your return from downtown, cars running in all three directions (Anse-à-l'Orme, Deux-Montagnes and YUL-Montreal-Trudeau Airport) will alternate. The direction will be indicated on each car.  

At this point, if you need to go to another branch, you can transfer quickly at the Bois-Franc Station. The REM will run at high frequency, so you won't have to wait long at the Bois-Franc station for your connection to the airport. 

Some examples of routes that will require a transfer:  

  • Kirkland > Bois-Franc (14 minutes) 
  • Bois-Franc > Montréal-Trudeau Airport (9 minutes) 
  • Anse-à-l'Orme > Bois-Franc (18 minutes) 
  • Bois-Franc > Deux-Montagnes (17 minutes) 

There are no plans to build a pedestrian bridge over Highway 40 as part of the REM project. The various municipalities are responsible for urban development around the stations.  

The REM will pass every 10 to 15 minutes on the airport branch. From Central Station to the airport, it will take from 18 to 20 minutes with the REM express shuttles, which will be available during peak hours of the airport.

Learn more

For more information about the REM, read our FAQ. If you have a specific question about the REM construction in your area, email or call us.

Architectural renders of the stations are presented in our Photos and videos section.

Environmental, technical and financial studies are available in our Documentation section.

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